Disneyland opened its Galaxy’s Edge land in May, and Disney World will open its version on August 29th. The delay had to do with how much deconstruction was required to start construction in Disney World where little tear-down was required in Disneyland because the area was built on an area that was previously used for backstage purposes.

In this article, we’re going to compare and contrast the Disneyland and Disney World versions of Galaxy’s Edge.

Website

Let’s start with the online presence of the land because this is where most guests will begin their journey.

The Disneyland site reflects the fact that Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge is already open.

The Disneyland site reflects the fact that Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge is already open.

The Disney World site indicates that the land will open soon!

The Disney World site indicates that the land will open soon!

Otherwise, the sites are identical.

Otherwise, the sites are identical.

Otherwise, the sites are identical.

Otherwise, the sites are identical.

As you can see, the websites for both coasts are very similar.

Landscape

Regardless of the delay in opening, the lands are nearly identical. The main difference can be seen in the color palette, which differs because of how the landscape is lit differently on each coast.

Here is a photo of the Marketplace in Disneyland.

Here is a photo of the Marketplace in Disneyland.

Here is the same Marketplace in Disney World. Notice the darker color palette!

Here is the same Marketplace in Disney World. Notice the darker color palette!

To further illustrate the different color pallets, look at this stair case in Disney World.

To further illustrate the different color pallets, look at this stair case in Disney World.

Here is the same staircase in Disneyland.

Here is the same staircase in Disneyland.

Attractions

The attractions, including Rise of the Resistance, which will not open until on December 5th in Disney’s Hollywood Studios, are identical in the experience, though, as mentioned above, the landscape outside differs.

This is Disneyland's version of the Millennium Falcon. This is the first time that the ship has been built in its complete form.

This is Disneyland’s version of the Millennium Falcon. This is the first time that the ship has been built in its complete form.

Here is the Disney World version of the Millennium Falcon, which is obviously more gray than tan.

Here is the Disney World version of the Millennium Falcon, which is obviously more gray than tan.

Dining

Dining establishments including Kat Saka’s Kettle, Dok-Ondar’s Den of Antiquities, and Ronto Roasters.

Oga’s Cantina serves food for breakfast along with alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages; Disneyland’s version does not serve food. Oga’s Cantina in Disney World also serves more alcoholic beverages throughout the day than the Disneyland version.

Here's Oga's Cantina in Disneyland from the outside.

Here’s Oga’s Cantina in Disneyland from the outside.

Oga's Cantina in Disney World appears to be duller in color than the Disneyland version.

Oga’s Cantina in Disney World appears to be duller in color than the Disneyland version.

You can listen to DJ Rex on both coasts!

You can listen to DJ Rex on both coasts!

Docking Bay 7 Food and Cargo in Disney World also serves alcohol while the Disneyland version does not. However, Disneyland’s Docking Bay 7’s menu accommodates gluten, egg, fish, milk, peanut, soy, and tree nut, allergies. Disney World presumably will also accommodate, but these items are not on the regular menu (at least not right now). Also, Disney World’s version has the same menu for lunch and dinner while Disneyland has separate menus for lunch and dinner.

Ronto Roasters also has a similar menu when it comes to food and specialty beverages, but the pattern continues that the Disney World version offers alcohol while the Disneyland version does not.

Here's Ronto Roasters in Disneyland.

Here’s Ronto Roasters in Disneyland.

Of course, you can get the outpost popcorn at Kat Saka’s Kettle on both coasts as well as Blue Milk at the Milk Stand.

Merchandise

Savi’s Workshop allows you to build your own lightsaber. The experience itself is identical, and even the cost is the same.

The Droid Depot is a workshop with random parts and some friendly locals who can help you build your very own BB-Series or R-Series droid. Like Savi’s Workshop, the Droid Depot’s appearance and cost are identical on both coasts.

The Droid Depot allows both Disneyland and Disney World guests to build their own droid, but the exteriors have different color palettes.

The Droid Depot allows both Disneyland and Disney World guests to build their own droid, but the exteriors have different color palettes.

Dok Ondar’s Den of Antiquities sells off-the-shelf merchandise including versions of the lightsabers and the droids. The selection and inside appearance are identical on both coasts.

Here's a look at Dok Ondar's Den of Antiquities in Disneyland.

Here’s a look at Dok Ondar’s Den of Antiquities in Disneyland.

Entrances

A quantifiable difference can be noted in the entrances. Disneyland has three entrances, while Disney World only has two: one at Grand Avenue and one from Toy Story Land to Batuu.

The entrance to Galaxy's Edge in Hollywood Studios is off Grand Avenue, near the Muppet Vision attraction.

The entrance to Galaxy’s Edge in Hollywood Studios is off Grand Avenue, near the Muppet Vision attraction.

Reservations

One major difference has to do with the logistics of the land. Disneyland required reservations for nearly a month before Galaxy’s Edge was fully open to the public.

Disney’s Hollywood Studios will have no such rule. However, there have been several preview events including for Make a Wish Families, members of the local Boys and Girls Clubs, Cast Members, and Annual Passholders. Once the land opens to the public, there will be Extra, Extra Magic Hours available along with extended park hours for Disney’s Hollywood Studios to maximize guests’ access to Galaxy’s Edge.

Conclusion

Any compare and contrast discussion leads naturally to thce question, “Which one is better?”. Well, the differences are so insignificant that the question is irrelevant. They’re both fun, and I think it’s cool that Disney has made something available on both coasts. In fact, this is the first time that they’ve ever built twin lands.

Identical Galaxy’s Edge lands: a good idea?