Last month, I reported that Disney would be moving from a season-based ticket system to a date-based ticket system.

We were all pretty worried what this might mean for ticket prices. Would they go up? Would they stay the same? Would Disney hike costs on certain days?

I’m here to report what actually happened when Disney officially switched to the date-based ticket system.

Let’s take a look:

Disney’s Date-Based Ticketing

Disney’s new date-based ticketing system has one really nice perk: you can see what every day will cost! When you look at the ticket prices, you’ll actually look at a calendar now. The calendar is broken down into three, already familiar, categories: Value, Regular, and Peak.

The days are color coded, and you can click on the days and see the prices. You can now be more informed when choosing your dates!

Disney's new date-based ticketing allows you to see what each day will cost!

Disney’s new date-based ticketing allows you to see what each day will cost!

Pricing

It’s not often that we see that Disney lowered ticket prices, but that’s basically what they did with this new system.

How?

Because all of the parks are now priced the same. Magic Kingdom used to be priced higher than Epcot, Disney’s Hollywood Studios, and Disney’s Animal Kingdom for single day tickets.

Now that Hollywood Studios is ramping up their offerings, the park is becoming more popular, and Disney has decided to even out their pricing. With promised updates, Epcot could draw more crowds too, and Animal Kingdom has drawn in more people with Pandora.  So all the parks now cost the same, and there is no longer a higher price only for the Magic Kingdom.

Before this new system, Value Days in the less expensive parks cost around $108 and Magic Kingdom cost around $116. Similar Peak days reached $129 and $137 respectively.

Now, Value tickets for all parks are $102, Regular tickets are $114, and Peak tickets are $122. Sure, it’s not a huge difference, but it might buy you a turkey leg!

What’s more, the former Value, Regular, and Peak dates haven’t changed at all from the previous calendar!  Some people were concerned that Disney would increase the number of Regular or Peak days to effectively charge more money, but that didn’t happen.

It's not often that Disney lowers prices, in any way, but it has happened.

It’s not often that Disney lowers prices, in any way, but it has happened.

What it means

Now booking your Disney World tickets will be more like booking your flight since you can see a pricing calendar right from the site. This will be less helpful for those planning to visit for multiple days, but it will be very helpful for guests visiting for just one day!

Disney’s new date-based pricing lowered some prices:  Excited?